My name is Kabby and I made this mostly to post dumb pictures. Probably of Spider-Man.

 

grimmhooke:

chirart:

fauxsquared:

for those who do not know who cybersix is.

I always feel so pained when people don’t know Cybersix.

Cybersix is a forgotten national treasure of Canadian programming — it’s an unexpected collaboration between the Japanese studio TMS Animation and the Canadian animation network Teletoon. It’s a loose adaptation of the Argentine comic of the same name and cancelled only after a 13 episode season run (probably because it was too good to exist) and market distribution thereafter has been limited and obscure at best.

The MC is genderqueer/nonbinary who presents as a male teacher by day and a lady crime fighter by night, has a brother who also happens to be a panther who also fights crime, has a bara love interest who is drawn to both identities, the villains are ex-Nazi SS agents, AMAZING ANIMATION, and so many other great things.

Also the opening is gorgeous.

Now here’s a show I haven’t heard about in a billion years.  I remember really digging the animation.

kingkaiser:

Haven’t posted in a while so here’s a good ol’ doodle dump. 

Anonymous asked
i had a dream about magical girls that had super strength/agility, but instead of wearing a special outfit they would shed their skin and turn into a skeleton.

fierceisnotenough:

iguanamouth:

I’d watch that

eamo2747 asked
I'm confused about what Beethoven was doing in the black composers post. He was German.

deadcatwithaflamethrower:

whitepeoplestealingculture:

By golly gee! I keep forgetting that Black people didn’t exist until the Fresh Prince of Bel Air came on television! Or that Black people existed in anywhere else than Africa even with slavery going on :) My apologies.

Anyway, here’s proof that Beethoven was Black:

"… Said directly, Beethoven was a black man. Specifically, his mother was a Moor, that group of Muslim Northern Africans who conquered parts of Europe—making Spain their capital—for some 800 years.

In order to make such a substantial statement, presentation of verifiable evidence is compulsory. Let’s start with what some of Beethoven’s contemporaries and biographers say about his brown complexion:

Beethoven2

(Louis Letronne, Beethoven, 1814, pencil drawing.)

"Frederick Hertz, German anthropologist, used these terms to describe him: ‘Negroid traits, dark skin, flat, thick nose.’

Emil Ludwig, in his book ‘Beethoven,’ says: ‘His face reveals no trace of the German. He was so dark that people dubbed him Spagnol [dark-skinned].’

Fanny Giannatasio del Rio, in her book ‘An Unrequited Love: An Episode in the Life of Beethoven,’ wrote ‘His somewhat flat broad nose and rather wide mouth, his small piercing eyes and swarthy [dark] complexion, pockmarked into the bargain, gave him a strong resemblance to a mulatto.’

deathmaskdeathmask2
Beethoven’s death mask: profile and full face

C. Czerny stated, ‘His beard—he had not shaved for several days—made the lower part of his already brown face still darker.’

Following are one word descriptions of Beethoven from various writers: Grillparzer, ‘dark’; Bettina von Armin, ‘brown’; Schindler, ‘red and brown’; Rellstab, ‘brownish’; Gelinek, ‘short, dark.’

In Alexander Thayer’s Life of Beethoven, vol.1, p. 134,  the author states, “there is none of that obscurity which exalts one to write history as he would have it and not as it really was. The facts are too patent.” On this same page, he states that the German composer Franz Josef Haydn was referred to as a “Moor” by Prince Esterhazy, and Beethoven had “even more of the Moor in his looks.’ On p. 72, a Beethoven contemporary, Gottfried Fischer, describes him as round-nosed and of dark complexion. Also, he was called ‘der Spagnol’ (the Spaniard).

Other “patent” sources, of which there are many, include, but are not limited to, Beethoven by Maynard Solomon, p.78. He is described as having “thick, bristly coal-black hair” (in today’s parlance, we proudly call it ‘kinky’) and a ‘ruddy-complexioned face.’ In   Beethoven:  His Life and Times by Artes Orga, p.72, Beethoven’s pupil, Carl Czerny of the ‘School of Velocity’ fame, recalls that Beethoven’s ‘coal-black hair, cut a la Titus, stood up around his head [sounds almost like an Afro].  His black beard…darkened the lower part of his dark-complexioned face.’

  BeethovenCweb

Engraving by Blasius Hofel, Beethoven, 1814, color facsimile of engraving after a pencil drawing by Louis Letronne. This engraving was regarded in Beethoven’s circle as particularly lifelike. Beethoven himself thought highly of it, and gave several copies to his friends.

Beethoven, the Black Spaniard

(read more here)

They whitewashed BEETHOVEN?  O_O

Thank you, history/fact-checking Tumblr.

I now feel the need to go burn every white-skinned image of Beethoven I can find.

nihongoing | Japan Shopping

ramavoite:

katsudonburi:

ohicosplay:

Welcome to Japan Shopping
Hello! My name is Kaze, and while most of you coming here will know me, some might not. I’m based in Osaka, Japan, and I’m opening myself to be your personal Japan shopping service! Everything from electronics to grocery store candies, whatever you might want, I’ll source it and send it to you via your preferred shipping method. Read below for further information, a special deal and the sign-up!

My friend just opened a personal shopping service! If there’s something you’d like shipped from Japan, please take a look.

Friend of mine trying to get a little business off the ground.

Signal boosting because Kaze is awesome.

kyletwebster:

REBLOG for a chance to WIN! Time for another competition AND it’s time for a sale! Use the code: SEPTSALE at checkout when purchasing the Real Watercolors, Screentones, or Megapack from my Photoshop brush shop. 

THREE random Tumblr users who reblog this post will WIN ALL THREE of these amazing Photoshop brush sets. These are the same brushes used by artists at Disney, Dreamworks, Sony, Google, Marvel, and Rockstar Games. They were recently featured on WIRED.com and were also written about in Communication Arts, and they have become the industry standard for pros who draw and paint in Photoshop!

So, again - all three sets are on sale through Thursday, September 4th at KYLEBRUSH.com. Simply enter this code at checkout: SEPTSALE

And, please reblog this post for a chance to win all three sets for free. Winners will be announced Friday, September 5th.

allthecanadianpolitics:

The 25/60 rule says Harper can be re-elected in 2015

Stephen Harper and his Conservative Party of Canada (CPC) can still win the next election, scheduled for October 2015. Yes, opinion polls have turned against the CPC. It’s true many Canadians cannot abide Harper. And there is no great economic news in sight that can be used to whip up Conservative support among non-partisan voters.
Thanks to Canada’s first-past-the-post electoral system, Stephen Harper can repeat his 2011 victory by garnering support from one voter in four. All he needs is for four voters out of 10 to stay home.
The 25/60 rule says when only 60 per cent of Canadian citizens go out to vote, 25 per cent of the voters can deliver a majority government. In 2011, the Conservatives received 39 per cent of the vote, and won 53 per cent of the seats, because only 61 per cent of Canadians made the effort to vote.
Political power to redefine the public interest and remake the country was handed to the CPC by 24 per cent of eligible Canadians voters.
Of course to be re-elected, Harper must hold on to this core support, the fabled Conservative “base.” Witness continued CPC emphasis on building pipelines, tax cuts, tough-on-crime measures, exalting the military, and portraying the leader as a tough guy.
In the last election there were far more absentee voters (39 per cent) than CPC supporters (24 per cent). The disengagement from the electoral process is the key to the success of the Conservatives in Canada and of right-wing politics elsewhere.
The Conservative strategy is to drive people away from politics and politicians. Attacking the character and suitability of rival leaders through constant television advertising, and contributing to “gotcha” journalism through a stream of commentary focusing on personal foibles helps create disgust with politics.
Canadian democratic icon Thérèse Casgrain led the Quebec fight to get women the vote. A national award for voluntary service was named after Casgrain, a fitting tribute, recognizing the importance of citizen action in securing democratic rights. The Casgrain award was abolished by the Mulroney Conservatives. After it was reinstated by the Chrétien Liberals, the Harper Conservatives disappeared Casgrain again, and re-branded the honour created in her name … the Prime Minister’s Awards.
It was as if the Harper government wanted Canadians to forget that the right to vote had been fought for, and used to promote human well-being.
In the magnificent drive for U.S. civil rights legislation, the late Martin Luther King said “our weapon is our vote.” A goal of the movement he led was to register black voters. Would-like-to-be-democrats living in a country without voting rights understand what King was aiming to achieve.
The extension of the electoral franchise has been an historic objective of the labour movement and the women’s movement for good reason. No meaningful social and economic legislation can be expected without pressure from large numbers of voters.
In the Ontario provincial election, the Liberals secured re-election because a further-to-the-right Conservative leader scared off voters, and because Ontario labour made a concerted effort to get union members to vote.
In British Columbia, the clearly right-of-centre Liberals won re-election despite a significant effort by the BC Federation of Labour to get the vote out for the NDP. Strong opposition to the B.C. Liberals emerged in an earlier campaign mounted to withdraw the GST. That opposition had dissipated by the time of the 2013 election. With a charismatic new leader and not enough electoral strength from the other right-wing party, the Conservatives, to divide the anti-NDP vote, the Liberals won.
As Nora Loreto reported from the Peoples’ Social Forum, building on the success of the Ontario labour effort to mobilize the vote, a union campaign to implement a strategic voting campaign is being talked about as the way to defeat the Harper Conservatives in 2015.
These campaigns have been tried in the past and have yielded contradictory results. For example, in 2011, strategic voting suggested that the Bloc was the best bet to keep Harper weak in Quebec, that is, until the Orange Wave happened, and 59 NDP candidates were successful in winning Parliamentary seats.
Former CCF/NDP MP, the late Colin Cameron, used to say that in years of successful campaigning, he never asked anybody for their vote. He asked them for their attention. “If I got their attention, I got their vote,” he would say.
Defeating Harper at the polls will require getting people’s attention, and convincing them to engage in the political process. It is not enough to blame Conservatives and other political parties for the failure of citizens to get out to vote.
Citizens need to be clear about what is at stake when political power gets into the hands of people like Stephen Harper, whose idea of the common good is that it is best served by corporations, and that the role of government is to enable monied interests to pursue private profit.
Duncan Cameron is the president of rabble.ca and writes a weekly column on politics and current affairs.

allthecanadianpolitics:

The 25/60 rule says Harper can be re-elected in 2015

Stephen Harper and his Conservative Party of Canada (CPC) can still win the next election, scheduled for October 2015. Yes, opinion polls have turned against the CPC. It’s true many Canadians cannot abide Harper. And there is no great economic news in sight that can be used to whip up Conservative support among non-partisan voters.

Thanks to Canada’s first-past-the-post electoral system, Stephen Harper can repeat his 2011 victory by garnering support from one voter in four. All he needs is for four voters out of 10 to stay home.

The 25/60 rule says when only 60 per cent of Canadian citizens go out to vote, 25 per cent of the voters can deliver a majority government. In 2011, the Conservatives received 39 per cent of the vote, and won 53 per cent of the seats, because only 61 per cent of Canadians made the effort to vote.

Political power to redefine the public interest and remake the country was handed to the CPC by 24 per cent of eligible Canadians voters.

Of course to be re-elected, Harper must hold on to this core support, the fabled Conservative “base.” Witness continued CPC emphasis on building pipelines, tax cuts, tough-on-crime measures, exalting the military, and portraying the leader as a tough guy.

In the last election there were far more absentee voters (39 per cent) than CPC supporters (24 per cent). The disengagement from the electoral process is the key to the success of the Conservatives in Canada and of right-wing politics elsewhere.

The Conservative strategy is to drive people away from politics and politicians. Attacking the character and suitability of rival leaders through constant television advertising, and contributing to “gotcha” journalism through a stream of commentary focusing on personal foibles helps create disgust with politics.

Canadian democratic icon Thérèse Casgrain led the Quebec fight to get women the vote. A national award for voluntary service was named after Casgrain, a fitting tribute, recognizing the importance of citizen action in securing democratic rights. The Casgrain award was abolished by the Mulroney Conservatives. After it was reinstated by the Chrétien Liberals, the Harper Conservatives disappeared Casgrain again, and re-branded the honour created in her name … the Prime Minister’s Awards.

It was as if the Harper government wanted Canadians to forget that the right to vote had been fought for, and used to promote human well-being.

In the magnificent drive for U.S. civil rights legislation, the late Martin Luther King said “our weapon is our vote.” A goal of the movement he led was to register black voters. Would-like-to-be-democrats living in a country without voting rights understand what King was aiming to achieve.

The extension of the electoral franchise has been an historic objective of the labour movement and the women’s movement for good reason. No meaningful social and economic legislation can be expected without pressure from large numbers of voters.

In the Ontario provincial election, the Liberals secured re-election because a further-to-the-right Conservative leader scared off voters, and because Ontario labour made a concerted effort to get union members to vote.

In British Columbia, the clearly right-of-centre Liberals won re-election despite a significant effort by the BC Federation of Labour to get the vote out for the NDP. Strong opposition to the B.C. Liberals emerged in an earlier campaign mounted to withdraw the GST. That opposition had dissipated by the time of the 2013 election. With a charismatic new leader and not enough electoral strength from the other right-wing party, the Conservatives, to divide the anti-NDP vote, the Liberals won.

As Nora Loreto reported from the Peoples’ Social Forum, building on the success of the Ontario labour effort to mobilize the vote, a union campaign to implement a strategic voting campaign is being talked about as the way to defeat the Harper Conservatives in 2015.

These campaigns have been tried in the past and have yielded contradictory results. For example, in 2011, strategic voting suggested that the Bloc was the best bet to keep Harper weak in Quebec, that is, until the Orange Wave happened, and 59 NDP candidates were successful in winning Parliamentary seats.

Former CCF/NDP MP, the late Colin Cameron, used to say that in years of successful campaigning, he never asked anybody for their vote. He asked them for their attention. “If I got their attention, I got their vote,” he would say.

Defeating Harper at the polls will require getting people’s attention, and convincing them to engage in the political process. It is not enough to blame Conservatives and other political parties for the failure of citizens to get out to vote.

Citizens need to be clear about what is at stake when political power gets into the hands of people like Stephen Harper, whose idea of the common good is that it is best served by corporations, and that the role of government is to enable monied interests to pursue private profit.

Duncan Cameron is the president of rabble.ca and writes a weekly column on politics and current affairs.